//Navy Tan Long Wallet

Navy Tan Long Wallet

The initial commissioned piece was quite different with a lot of back and forth, and changes before the design was finalised. Ordered by a client who wanted something unique, yet classic and would fit specific uses.

This wallet comfortable fits 100AUD notes and has plenty of space for cards. I am quite pleased with how this piece turned out as it has a sleek and minimal appearance.

Materials

Step 1: Scratch Lines

Amy Roke Polyester Thread

Hand-stitched at 9 stitches per inch (3mm) with Dark Sapphire P45 (632 – 0.45mm).

Step 1: Scratch Lines

Kangaroo Leather

Full-grain leather is the top and strongest layer of the hide, the surface has not been buffed or sanded to conceal imperfections.
Kangaroo leather is known for its strength and durability, and has a beautiful characteristic where it wrinkles. The leather used is undyed vegetable tanned which will develop a patina over time.

Step 1: Scratch Lines

Alran Chevre Chagrin Sully

Shrunken goat from the renown French tannery, ALRAN S.A.S.
This goat leather is their top grade and is both chrome tanned and veg tanned in an unique 23 step process that takes over 3 weeks to produce each hide. This gives the leather its’ beautiful grain, soft supple feel and even colour. The grain has a natural texture that adds beautiful depth to the leather, and has excellent water and scratch resistance.

Step 1: Scratch Lines

UnitersPro Edge Paint 2000

Several coats of this water-based edge paint is hand-mixed to match the leather, provides a matt full finish protecting the raw edges of the piece.

Step 1: Scratch Lines

Wax Mix

A mixture of beeswax, paraffin wax and neatsfoot oil is used to burnish the edges of vegetable-tanned leather.

Step 1: Selection

Step 1: Scratch Lines

The raw materials were selected for their colour and properties

Step 2: Templating

Step 1: Scratch Lines

I’ve never made a wallet in this style before so I used paper templates to get the feel for the size and shape.

Step 3: Acrylic Finish

Step 1: Scratch Lines

I was working with unfinished, undyed vegetable tanned leather which I put a finish on. This coat helps prevent scratches and limits water absorption. Usually you would pout on a finish coat on after dying however the client wanted a nice tan to contrast the navy.

Step 4: Cutting

Step 1: Scratch Lines
Step 1: Scratch Lines

The leather is hand-cut to size.

Step 5: Skiving (Thinning)

Step 1: Cut strips

The edges of each piece is skived (thinned . This will help give the overall impression that the item is slimmer.

Step 6: Stamping

Step 1: Cut strips

Custom initials and my maker’s mark are stamped.

Step 7: Edge Creasing

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

This is an aesthetic detail that I put on all my items.

Step 8: Kangaroo Edges

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

The edges of the kangaroo are bevelled, sanded and polished with wax.

Step 9: Cement

Step 1: Cut strips

The pockets are aligned, cemented and stitched on.

Step 10: Trim and Punch

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

The sides are trimmed to produce a flush edge before being punched for sewing.

Step 11: Stitching

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

I am using Atelier Amy Roke’s Dark Sapphire 632 thread, stitched at 9 stitches per inch.

Saddle-stitching is a traditional method of stitching that uses two needles and one long run of thread to produce an even slant on both sides of the leather.

This is a unique method of stitching unique to leatherworking, and produces the strongest known stitch that cannot be replicated by machines.

Step 12: Main Piece

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

The process is repeated to attach the two sides to the main piece.

Since the sides are thicker, an awl is used to help keep the pierced lines straight.

Step 13: Edge Finishing

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

Firstly, colours are hand-mixed to match the leather. The navy was made using a mixture of black, celeste and blue.

The paint is applied using a roller before being heated then sanded down. This process is repeated several times until a smooth even coat is reached.

Lastly, wax is melted and rubbed on to help give a protective finish to the paint.

Finishing edges creates better protection against moisture and clean smooth edges are a sign of a skilled leather craftsman. This is a particularly tedious process as several layers are needed to get a smooth even finish.

Step 14: Final Touches

Step 1: Cut strips

Lastly the wallet is brushed down with a horse-hair brush and ready to ship.

Scraps!

Step 1: Cut strips
Step 1: Cut strips

Made a matching pair of stainless steel cuff-links with some of the left over leather.

Queries and feedback are welcome.

Leave a comment, head over to the contact page, or email directly at hello@kinzleather.com

By | 2018-05-29T19:34:27+00:00 May 29th, 2018|Project Builds|0 Comments

Leave A Comment